Acknowledgements

Nearly every service SyncRPG offers is made possible because of the work of many other people. On this page, we try to do our best to give credit to the various people who have built the tools that we have built on top of. We really do stand on the shoulders of giants here. It is our goal to properly recognize everything that everyone has done that has made the work we do possible. If you represent or are related to any of these groups or services and feel that you should be recognized here, or recognized in a different way, please let us know.

RPTools Developers and Community

The suite of tools produced by the RPTools developers is amazing. MapTool is an extremely flexible Virtual Tabletop (VTT) developed by the guys over at RPTools.net. It’s an application that allows players to connect to a Game Master’s computer and play a game as if they were sitting at the same table. It allows for extremely detailed maps, deeply interactive combats, and scripted events through an extensive macro language.

Our SyncRPG VTT is based wholly on MapTool. After much deliberation, we decided that in order to deliver the best experience for the users of our service, we would need a high level of control over the source code of the VTT application we were using. The bottom line is that we needed to add code in the application itself that was specific to our service, and that it did not belong in the main MapTool repository. We decided to fork MapTool, released under the Apache 2.0 license, and to create our own version of the codebase.

To respect the “spirit of openness” that the original developers brought when creating the tool, we have decided to keep our version completely free, with the source code freely available, just like theirs. We will never make a cent off the labor of love that is MapTool, but we hope to add value to it through our services. We will do our best to work with the original RPTools developers: If we find and fix a bug in the base code, we will submit fixes to their project in hopes that they can mirror them. The original “Credits List” for MapTool at the time of our fork can be found here.

In addition to the developers themselves, MapTool has a community of loyal users, who have stuck it out and continue to play and produce material, both free and for sale. They have a community forum to discuss all sorts of things related to MapTool, as well to share any resources that members have created and shared.

Mike Chopswil

The initial set of PFRPG monsters imported into SyncRPG were from a spreadheet made available on d20pfsrd.com. The sheet's copyright information is reproduced below.

Monster Database. Copyright 2011 Mike Chopswil, d20pfsrd.com

Character Sheet Designers

One of the fundamental things we pointed to when starting this project is that we, personally, would never make “the best” character sheet for any given game. There are many people who have spent inordinate amounts of time working on sheets, making them beautiful, automated, and easy to use. Competing with those sheets would be stupid. They’re great, we should just use them. All of these people worked very hard to provide these character sheets, free of charge, and they deserve all the respect and thanks we can give for doing it far better than we ever would. We feel that sharing their sheets with our users, with references to the original author and links to the template is a sincere form of flattery. Character Sheet Designers are referenced directly whenever their sheet templates are referenced. If you have created a sheet and want credit, or if you’d like us not to use your sheet for any reason, please let us know.

Google

The free services offered by Google never cease to amaze us. We use Google Apps for all kinds of things internally, we all use GMail personally and professionally, their analytics software is fantastic, and the core functionality of our site is built on character sheets that are created and shared on Google Drive™. All of this is given to everyone, for free. The best part, though, is the standard of quality that Google brings to their services. Google Apps aren’t just free, they’re well-made, relatively bug free, auto-saving, fault tolerant, and available anywhere you have a browser. Anyone can jot down notes from their phone, add comments to manuscripts from their laptop, or update a character sheet from their tablet.